Ka: Stories of the Mind and Gods of India ePUB Ý of

Ka: Stories of the Mind and Gods of India ePUB Ý of
    IGNOU books 2019 In Hindi Online PDF Free Death, of the first sexual union and the first parricide We Ka: Stories Epub / learn why Siva must carry his father s skull, why snakes have forked tongues, and why, as part of a certain sacrifice, the king s wife must copulate with a dead horse A tour de force of scholarship and seduction, Ka is irresistible."/>
  • Paperback
  • 464 pages
  • Ka: Stories of the Mind and Gods of India
  • Roberto Calasso
  • English
  • 18 May 2019
  • 0679775471

Ka: Stories of the Mind and Gods of India[Reading] ➼ Ka: Stories of the Mind and Gods of India By Roberto Calasso – Essayreview.co.uk With the same narrative fecundity and imaginative sympathy he brought to his acclaimed retelling of the Greek myths, Roberto Calasso plunges Western readers into the mind of ancient India He begins wi With the same narrative fecundity and imaginative of the Epub â sympathy he brought to his acclaimed retelling of the Greek myths, Roberto Calasso plunges Western readers into the mind of ancient India He begins with a mystery Why is the most important god in the Rg Veda, the oldest of India s sacred texts, known by a secret name Ka, or Who What ensues is not an explanation, but an unveiling Here are the stories of the creation of mind and matter of the origin of Death, of the first sexual union and the first parricide We Ka: Stories Epub / learn why Siva must carry his father s skull, why snakes have forked tongues, and why, as part of a certain sacrifice, the king s wife must copulate with a dead horse A tour de force of scholarship and seduction, Ka is irresistible.


About the Author: Roberto Calasso

Roberto Calasso born May in of the Epub â Florence is an Italian publisher and writer He was born into a family of the local upper class, well connected with some of the great Italian intellectuals of their time His maternal grandfather Giovanni Codignola was a professor of philosophy at Florence University Codignola created a new publishing house called La Nuova Italia, in Florence, just like his friend Benedetto Croce had done in Bari with Laterza His uncle Tristano Codignola, partigiano during the Resistenza, after the war joined the political life of the new republic, and Ka: Stories Epub / was for a while Minister of Education His mother Melisenda who gave up a promising academic career to raise her three children was a scholar of German literature, and had worked on H lderlin s translations of the Greek poet Pindar His father Francesco was a law professor, first at Florence University and then in Rome, where he eventually became dean of his faculty He has been working for Adelphi Edizioni since its founding in and became its Chairman in His books have from been translated into most European languages After a Stories of the Kindle Ô successful career in publishing he has become a leading intellectual citation needed He is the author of a work in progress, that started with The Ruin of Kasch in , a book welcome by Italo Calvino, dedicated to the French statesman Talleyrand and to a reflection on the culture of modernity This was followed in by The Marriage of Cadmus and Harmony, a book where the tale of Cadmus and his wife Harmonia becomes a pretext for re writing the great tales of Greek mythology and reflect on the reception of Greek culture for a contemporary readership The trend for portraying whole civilizations continues with Ka where the subject of the re writing is Hindu mythology K instead restricts the focus to one single author Franz Kafka this trend continues with Il rosa Tiepolo, inspired by an adjective used by Proust to describe a shade of pink used by Tiepolo in his paintings With his latest book, La folie Baudelaire, Calasso goes back to the fresco of whole civilisations, this time re writing the lives and works of the artists that revolutionised our artistic taste, the symbolist poets and impressionist paintersHis essaystic production is collected in a few books I quarantanove gradini The Forty nine Steps, a collection of essays about major authors and thinkers in European modernity addressed to Pierre Klossowski and his wife His Oxford lessons are collected in Literature and the Gods In Calasso published La follia che viene dalle ninfe, a collection of essays on the influence of the nymph in literature, which is discussed through authors ranging from Plato to Nabokov.


10 thoughts on “Ka: Stories of the Mind and Gods of India

  1. says:

    What Calasso did with western classical mythology in The Marriage of Cadmus and Harmony he also does with Indian mythology I was aware that Kali represents death and that Ganesha has the head of an elephant A few years ago I read The Mahabharata I have a basic familiarity with the life of Buddha But that s a weak foundation for understanding the complex nature of Indian mythology As a westerner I doubt I can properly appreciate in one reading the nuances and richness of their mythic traditi What Calasso did with western classical mythology in The Marriage of Cadmus and Harmony he also does with Indian mythology I was aware that Kali represents death and that Ganesha has the head of an elephant A few years ago I read The Mahabharata I have a basic familiarity with the life of Buddha But that s a weak foundation for understanding the complex nature of Indian mythology As a westerner I doubt I can properly appreciate in one reading the nuances and richness of their mythic tradition Fortunately, Calasso s beautiful writing transcends my ignorance Unable to understand the intricate spiderweb of associations and meanings involved in these stories, I nevertheless relished the poetic prose with which he tells them As if he realizes some may have diffuculty relating to the material, Calasso occasionally makes a comparison to western references In this way we learn that Prajapati is like the K of Kafka s novels or that Proust s Marcel watching Albertine sleep is like a seer experiencing the fusion of the human with the natural world They are 2 of the mileposts marking the journey Calasso takes us on, one filled with colorful landscapes and characters as enchanting as they are frightening It s a beautiful and compelling read

  2. says:

    A bloody, feverish story has embedded itself in the sky It reminds us that it will go on happening forever Fitting, that in this retelling of what are some of the oldest stories known to man that Ka translates as the space between, or Who For it s the mystery that we are after in this existence Now I know that this question will haunt us forever, until time itself dissolves Calasso s book accounts the gods, as if, in their doings, our own plight is revealed So many things happening A bloody, feverish story has embedded itself in the sky It reminds us that it will go on happening forever Fitting, that in this retelling of what are some of the oldest stories known to man that Ka translates as the space between, or Who For it s the mystery that we are after in this existence Now I know that this question will haunt us forever, until time itself dissolves Calasso s book accounts the gods, as if, in their doings, our own plight is revealed So many things happening, so many stories, one inside the other with every link hiding yetstories And I ve hardly hatched from my egg It s overwhelming The wheel of time would go on turning to the point where the last, and hitherto mute knowledge would speak And, if we are honest with ourselves, frightening The surface of the wakeful mind trembles without cease, like the surface of the waters And like the waters, it assumes the shapes of those forces that press upon it The mind is our protagonist The mind The mind was what transformed and what was transformed It was the warmth, the hidden flame behind the bones, the succession and dissolution of shapes sketched on the darkness and the sensation of knowing that was happening The world is its antagonist Nothing enchants the mindthan the existence of the outside world, of something that resists it and will not obey Pampered by its own omnipotence, its own capacity to connect and identify everything with everything, the mind needs an obstacle at least as big as the world The world is a desert where can we find the expedient that would turn that presence behind the eyes into something before the eyes The idea that there is an answer short of the telling of eternity is our flaw But perhaps this flaw is a blessing or even the vital force in that telling itself Is it any surprise, then, if ultimate knowledge can only become manifest through enigma The answer is the question Neither gods nor men can live without recourse to Ka To be precise they may survive but they cannot understand And the question becomes would we have it any other way Better to achieve immortality than already to have it, they thought with divine logic A cousin of Vollmann s, The Ice Shirt If you read as a means and not an end, i.e if you read for meaning, here is a concatenating metaphysical feast that both satisfies and delights That space between knowledge and living, setting and story, desire and death, form and mind All that is really required is a scene of blood confined in a perpetual light, and a gaze that follows fleeting signs forming against a shadowy backdrop

  3. says:

    Ka is a work of art, no less by the very brave Roberto Calasso To bring to book, Indian mythology, ANY mythology, really, is a daring attempt to pick prod through a dangerous territory of the book keepers of religion, the overlords of cults, the gardeners of religious doctrine breeders of creeds Calasso has somehow managed to paint this vast canvas with hues that complement the real picture, and woven a tapestry with many threads converging diverging to create a regaling picture of the H Ka is a work of art, no less by the very brave Roberto Calasso To bring to book, Indian mythology, ANY mythology, really, is a daring attempt to pick prod through a dangerous territory of the book keepers of religion, the overlords of cults, the gardeners of religious doctrine breeders of creeds Calasso has somehow managed to paint this vast canvas with hues that complement the real picture, and woven a tapestry with many threads converging diverging to create a regaling picture of the Hindu world s sacred lot He steps boldly into the world which worships millions of deities, and fearlessly picks the road less traveled, choosing to tell us their origins their consequent growth, trials tribulations Fascinating journeying through the book, I found myself wishing that it never ended, rather than getting to the end Now my only choice is to keep re reading it Such a treat

  4. says:

    Some of the most beautiful prose I have read, let alone in what appears to be a non fiction book, though that is an impossible qualification considering it is exploring the origins of Hindu mythology Reading this made my brain feel effervescent, and I often had to put the book down after a paragraph simply to savor what I had just read And sometime this would last for weeks before I could return to it.

  5. says:

    Ka is a great book about the gods and religious practices of ancient India I read this book in Hindi and in a day It was great to read the interpretation of an outsider I do not know if anybody has said so much in such brevity on this topic Although, it covers only minuscule section of Indian myths and stories, still it makes a great reading.

  6. says:

    Fullness drawn from fullness this is the Vedic doctrine Emptiness drawn from emptiness this is the Buddha s doctrine The transition from the Upanishads to the Buddha is one from fullness to emptiness But the shape is the same A journey through ancient Indian mythology right from the early vedic gods like Prajapati to the Buddha himself If you have studied even the basics of Indian philosophy I think this read will interest you, as one can see the evolution of certain ideas told through t Fullness drawn from fullness this is the Vedic doctrine Emptiness drawn from emptiness this is the Buddha s doctrine The transition from the Upanishads to the Buddha is one from fullness to emptiness But the shape is the same A journey through ancient Indian mythology right from the early vedic gods like Prajapati to the Buddha himself If you have studied even the basics of Indian philosophy I think this read will interest you, as one can see the evolution of certain ideas told through the many wild adventures of Gods, demons, heavenly beings and sages This is one of those books that will force you to open wikipedia every now and then in order to read about a particular character or concept The book does get dense in parts but one is rewarded at the end

  7. says:

    Sometimes I force myself to do things that I don t necessarily want to do because I perceive them as being good for me Recently, I wouldn t allow myself to leave my own dining room table until I finished a giant salad from Sweetgreen It took me over an hour to finish that salad and I may or may not have cried a little bit.I tend to reach for a book I think will be good for my brain to counteract a feeling I get every now and again that the Internet and my life are making me stupid I ve refe Sometimes I force myself to do things that I don t necessarily want to do because I perceive them as being good for me Recently, I wouldn t allow myself to leave my own dining room table until I finished a giant salad from Sweetgreen It took me over an hour to finish that salad and I may or may not have cried a little bit.I tend to reach for a book I think will be good for my brain to counteract a feeling I get every now and again that the Internet and my life are making me stupid I ve referred to it in a past review as bench presses for my brain This book has been in my to read stack since September and I thought my brain could use the exercise I ve always adored Greco Roman mythology, and I m always very interested in the Hindu myths my yoga teachers weave into their dharma talks at the beginning of class I thought I d be reading stories like the one about little Hanuman mistaking the sun for a big ripe mango and trying to eat it No such luck.Not unlike the salad incident, this book was mostly tortuous and I made myself finish it I began eagerly, frequently flipping back and forth to the glossary in an attempt to keep everything straight When the glossary proved to be equally confusing I gave up on that It also doesn t help that characters names change or are mentioned once in passing and then not again until 20 pages later.If there were actual stories or a narrative I think it would have been easier to remain engaged, but the text flowed as stream of consciousness on big, weighty, cosmological questions I assuaged my resulting feelings of being extra dumb by realizing it would be difficult for me, a mere mortal, to understand such matters anyway.Now, if you ll excuse me, I need to go have cake for dinner at tuck into the Tracy Morgan book There were flashes of brilliance that did sink in, and here they are Perhaps hopefully I absorbedthan I thought Listening to his mother, Garuda was like a schoolboy who for the first time hears something mentioned that will loom over his whole life p 6 P rvat loved it when she didn t understand What attracted her most was obscurity p 99 There is no nature without illusion, there is no illusion without power, there is no power without nature As for m y , rather than illusion it would beapt to call it magic, that strange thing that those supposedly of sober mind are convinced does not exist, while actually it would be farsober to say that nothing in existence can exist without it p 111 This is the decisive step awakening Something invisible that happens within thought Something that adds a new quality to thought consciousness p 175 Arjuna remembered some words Krsna had once hurriedly spoken Even the curses we undergo must be of use to us p 308 There is a point at which having something happen and recounting something converge they both leave an impression on the mind Telling a story is a way of having things happen at the highest possible speed, that of the mind p 314

  8. says:

    Damn if I understood it all I was chasing to understand the rubric of Hinduism better and I came across this highly acclaimed book The book is an encapsulation of Hindu scriptures from pre Veda days spanning to the days of Buddha, the 9th avatar of Vishnu.As exciting as the premise sounds, the book is dense Hindu scriptures, Veda, Vedanta, Upanishads and Geeta have been admitted as containing all the wisdom one must have to lead a meaningful, purpose filled life And, true as that is, what no Damn if I understood it all I was chasing to understand the rubric of Hinduism better and I came across this highly acclaimed book The book is an encapsulation of Hindu scriptures from pre Veda days spanning to the days of Buddha, the 9th avatar of Vishnu.As exciting as the premise sounds, the book is dense Hindu scriptures, Veda, Vedanta, Upanishads and Geeta have been admitted as containing all the wisdom one must have to lead a meaningful, purpose filled life And, true as that is, what no one blurts out, is they are very difficult to read So,often than not, I had to refer to secondary sources to understand my own religion Ka was such a venture.Ka starts from the time there was nothing but just a conscience, who was called Ka From him, everything including 33 Crore Gods, the sub, the moon, the people came to being And from the very initial days, everyone ruminated on the same thing What is the purpose of life Why do we live and what is that we should determine to find out And, as Calasso explains, the history of Hinduism, probably like any other, has been shaped over misadventures, anger, jealousy, love and most of all sacrifice.What Calasso tries to do is tie all the books with a common theme, explain some interesting myths, stories rather which deconstructs some of the everyday rituals we do like why Ganesha is called Vinayaka, how do we set up the Yoga, why Brahma has only 4 heads, etc.I know, I couldn t process most of the information in the book, and that I must read it again, withpatience and focus It s also clear I must reach out to the original sources one day Because I can t deny the bliss, the singularity in me while reading the book Knowing that we are but, just cogs in this whole scheme of things, it takes off the pressure of expectation For a moment, I could see clearly I am here to knowand learnAnd, as every great mind has shouted from the rooftop, revel in the present Don t worry about the future because you can t control it It s upon itself to happen Stay in today, make this moment count and you are already richer

  9. says:

    Simply brilliant Most Indians would have heard almost all the tales that are mentioned in this book But this book strings all the mythological tales together very intelligently and with a perspective that only someone with a wider perspective of human nature and thought processes can give There is also something different about Italian writers They write in a rich and often difficult language that takes time to get used to But once you are comfortable with the translation, you will realise Simply brilliant Most Indians would have heard almost all the tales that are mentioned in this book But this book strings all the mythological tales together very intelligently and with a perspective that only someone with a wider perspective of human nature and thought processes can give There is also something different about Italian writers They write in a rich and often difficult language that takes time to get used to But once you are comfortable with the translation, you will realise that they have a knack for presenting complex thoughts in a beautiful way It is not simple, but it is poetic Example Danube by Claudio Magris and Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino

  10. says:

    I recommend this book to Indians who have had no exposure to Hindu scriptures The author takes you through the mystic world of Indian scriptures, the origin of human life and the relationship with gods, the subtle interpretations of intrigues starting from the awe struck Vinatha in the majestic presence of her son Garuda The book reads like poetry I was amazed by the breadth and depth of the author s understanding It takes time to complete the book, but assure you it is worth every minute of I recommend this book to Indians who have had no exposure to Hindu scriptures The author takes you through the mystic world of Indian scriptures, the origin of human life and the relationship with gods, the subtle interpretations of intrigues starting from the awe struck Vinatha in the majestic presence of her son Garuda The book reads like poetry I was amazed by the breadth and depth of the author s understanding It takes time to complete the book, but assure you it is worth every minute of it

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