The Hollow Land Epub ì The Hollow PDF/EPUB ²

The Hollow Land Epub ì The Hollow  PDF/EPUB ²
  • Paperback
  • 160 pages
  • The Hollow Land
  • Jane Gardam
  • English
  • 13 October 2019
  • 1609452461

The Hollow Land[PDF / Epub] ☆ The Hollow Land By Jane Gardam – Essayreview.co.uk The barren, beautiful Cumbrian fells provide the bewitching setting for the adventures of Bell and Harry, two children who find enchanting wonder at every turn, as they explore THE HOLLOW LAND Everyda The barren, beautiful Cumbrian fells provide the bewitching setting for the adventures of Bell and Harry, two children who find enchanting wonder at every turn, as they explore The Hollow Land Everyday challenges give a daring edge to this rural work and play There are ancient mysteries to explore and uncover, like the case of the Egg Witch, and everyone is curious about the Household Name, a The Hollow PDF/EPUB ² wildly famous Londoner moving in to the jewel of the territory, Light Trees Farm With painterly ease, Jane Gardam s stories fly with a marvelous spirit that will delight readers of all ages.


About the Author: Jane Gardam

Jane Mary Gardam OBE is a British author of children s and adult fiction She also reviews for the Spectator and the Telegraph, and writes for BBC radio She lives in Kent, Wimbledon and Yorkshire She has won numerous literary awards including the Whitbread Award, twice She is mother of Tim Gardam, Principal of St Anne s College, Oxford Jane has been awarded the Heywood Hill Literary The Hollow PDF/EPUB ² Prize for a lifetime s contribution to the enjoyment of literature and has been shortlisted for the Booker PrizeHer first book for adults, Black Faces, White Faces , a collection of linked short stories about Jamaica, won both the David Higham Prize for Fiction and the Winifred Holtby Memorial Prize Subsequent collections of short stories include The Pangs of Love and Other Stories , winner of the Katherine Mansfield Award Going into a Dark House , which was awarded the PEN Macmillan Silver Pen Award and Missing the Midnight Hauntings Grotesques Jane Gardam s first novel for adults, God on the Rocks , a coming of age novel set in the s, was adapted for television in It won the Prix Baudelaire France in and was shortlisted for the Booker Prize for Fiction Her other novels include The Queen of the Tambourine , a haunting tale about a woman s fascination with a mysterious stranger, which won the Whitbread Novel Award Faith Fox , a portrait of England in the s and The Flight of the Maidens , set just after the Second World War, which narrates the story of three Yorkshire schoolgirls on the brink of university and adult life This book was adapted for BBC Radio s Woman s Hour In Jane Gardam was awarded the Heywood Hill Literary Prize in recognition of a distinguished literary careerHer non fiction includes a book about the Yorkshire of her childhood in The Iron Coast , published with photographs by Peter Burton and Harland WalshawShe also writes for children and young adults Her novel Bilgewater , originally written for children, has now been re classified as adult fiction She was awarded the Whitbread Children s Book Award for The Hollow Land and is the author of A Few Fair Days , a collection of short stories for children set on a Cumberland farm, and two novels for teenagers, A Long Way From Verona , which explores a wartime childhood in Yorkshire, and The Summer After the Funeral , a story about a loss of innocence after the death of a fatherJane Gardam is a member of PEN and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature She is married with three children and divides her time between East Kent and Yorkshire.


10 thoughts on “The Hollow Land

  1. says:

    I loved every word.If you love English novels, you ll love this.If you love Jane Gardam, you ll love this If you ve never read her, this is a great place to start Europa Books is re issueing her books, and the cover art is fabulous, as it is on all their novels One little nitpick, not with the book or author, but with it s classification as a children s book Either British children are miles ahead of American children in their reading, or their understanding of adult themes is muchmatu I loved every word.If you love English novels, you ll love this.If you love Jane Gardam, you ll love this If you ve never read her, this is a great place to start Europa Books is re issueing her books, and the cover art is fabulous, as it is on all their novels One little nitpick, not with the book or author, but with it s classification as a children s book Either British children are miles ahead of American children in their reading, or their understanding of adult themes is muchmature Bee Teesdale and Harry Bateman are children at the beginning, but that doesn t qualify it as a kid s book in my mind Don t pass it by for that reason

  2. says:

    Masterful So masterful and at the same time tightly succinct These chapters are short stories within themselves, but all related to a place in Yorkshire s fells and the group of families that live there This is alive with such power of exuberance amidst exact characterization and tone, that I would give it the 6th star I doubted that I would ever like any Jane Gardam work as much as I liked Old Filth, but this 1981 does it This was written to approach a child audience of just preteen Why d Masterful So masterful and at the same time tightly succinct These chapters are short stories within themselves, but all related to a place in Yorkshire s fells and the group of families that live there This is alive with such power of exuberance amidst exact characterization and tone, that I would give it the 6th star I doubted that I would ever like any Jane Gardam work as much as I liked Old Filth, but this 1981 does it This was written to approach a child audience of just preteen Why does it not surprise me that Jane does not underestimate the intelligence or emotional nuance to neighbor and community that exists in kids There is NO dumb down here.The dialect is poetic The ending with the eclipse viewed by the Standards, just sublime.Oh what a joyous place and it s for very reasons like these that I love and find a cottage in the country by the water There are many terms I needed to investigate here in these conversations, like beck That s another thing, Jane Gardam teaches me something with every chapter Her style is magical and her people just depths Depths in which kindness or chat chic is never missing.Strongly recommend this read for a summer peaceful place

  3. says:

    I adored this short novel set in former mining country hollowed out with old mines of North Yorkshire Folksy and gently humorous, it focuses on two boys, one a local farmer s son and one a London boy, son of a journalist, who visits for the summers The locals are colorful and well meaning and the boys adventures are sometimes dangerous but always turn out ok They grow up and live their lives in this plain place that Gardam has made magical.

  4. says:

    A magical book about friendship and love of the countryside and country life in this case, in Cumbria, UK I just finished and would be happy to start reading it again right now.

  5. says:

    So charming I wish it had gone on and on.

  6. says:

    Jane Gardam is good, but either I read this too fast or the book is just differently paced enough from her other work that I wasn t as in love with it as her other novels Still, Gardam does a good job writing a novel.

  7. says:

    FROM MY BLOG Eight year old Bell Teesdale watches with wonder when a family of Londoners talking South arrive to rent his parents farm house There s not owt for em here What s use of a farm to them Just for sitting in Never a thing going on The visitors get off to a rocky start with their summer landlords the older visitors do, that is, but not their 5 or 6 year old son Harry When the Batemans are about to cancel their vacation because they find the sounds of haying FROM MY BLOG Eight year old Bell Teesdale watches with wonder when a family of Londoners talking South arrive to rent his parents farm house There s not owt for em here What s use of a farm to them Just for sitting in Never a thing going on The visitors get off to a rocky start with their summer landlords the older visitors do, that is, but not their 5 or 6 year old son Harry When the Batemans are about to cancel their vacation because they find the sounds of haying too noisy, Bell watches the younger boy I sees this little lad, Harry, looking out of his bedroom window and I catches his eye And somehow I know he s all right, this one, London boy or not I know he understands how we have to make all this racket to see hay cut ahead of rain The boys become fast friends, the Batemans end up staying and returning year after year and the ensuing stories revolve about the boys friendship and adventures, as they age year by year, into their early teens Diligent followers of my blog will recall that, in 2012, my niece and I hiked some 70 miles through England s Lake District We climbed fells, jumped over becks, walked beside tarns, crossed meadows, and enjoyed the rain We talked to other hikers we exchanged pleasantries with innkeepers What we didn t do is talk to the folks who lived in the Lake District and who made their living from pursuits other than tourism.Maybe in the Lake District, everyone makes his living from tourism I don t know But I now know something of how folks live in Westland, the former county now absorbed into Cumbria immediately to the east of the Lake District After reading a laudatory review in the New York Times book section, I purchased and have just finished reading Jane Gardam s achingly beautiful collection of stories entitled The Hollow Land, published in 1981 in England and now published in America.Most of the stories have the shadow of a plot being trapped in a mine the title refers to how the village and the Teesdales farmland, rising up into the fells to the east, are built over a honeycomb of abandoned silver mines visiting a scary old woman who sells eggs the Egg Witch listening with a combination of scepticism and fear to local ghost stories, while outside the English rains beat down without mercy a long bike ride and hike through bitter cold, at Bell s urgent insistence, to behold a wondrous display of icicles, icicles that raise philosophical questions in the youngsters minds a run in with gypsies, who prove scarier by reputation than they are in person But these plotlines serve primarily as devices for the author to describe with intensity and in detail the awe inspiring beauty and the eccentric characters of the inhabitants of this corner of Westland She shows, without editorializing, how city dwellers including the Batemans, until they become acclimated zoom through life in a daze, failing to observe the wonders about them that are so obvious to the shepherds and farmers of the countryside Not even professed lovers of nature trail hikers are exempt from Bell s boyish scornThey walk in clumps great fat orange folk with long red noses and maps in plastic cases flapping across their stomachs Transisters going sometimes too, and looking at nowt before them but their own two feet I think back over my own hikes in Britain I can only hope I seemed different But it s not just the beauty of nature that Londoners ignore, and it s not only how the land serves harmoniously to raise crops and graze sheep and cows What is equally important to the families who live here and whose ancestors have lived here from time immemorial is the history they have inherited And if the history at times includes questionable horrors and terrifying ghosts the combination of history and legend and folk tale is a force that binds them to the soil and to each otherMrs Teesdale and Mrs Bateman set out for the antique shop about half past two It was only a few miles over Stain, over the wonderful old road the Greeks and Celts and Romans and Vikings, Angles, Saxons, and the odd Jute had used before themadventurously Ghost upon ghost haunts this road from Greta Bridge, where a spirit got caught under a stone and twice they ve had to put her back to the blue ghost you can see sometimes on bright sunny afternoons near Bowes, the wife of a Saxon lord still wearing her Saxon dress, but without her head to the white ghost near the old mines who walks quietly in her apron Londoners may have their transistors and their holidays on Spanish beaches what they have lost is the richness of a life unself consciously enmeshed in history and in nature.The final chapter jumps ahead twenty years to 1999, when Bell and Harry have become adults, and when the flow of petroleum has for unstated reasons dried up Horses, railroads, and steam engines are again of critical importance But the paradise of the Teesdales world is threatened by a figure who represents all that endangers the family s happiness and their orderly world selfishness, rapacity, and an unthinking hunger for mineral wealth that gladly and willingly sacrifices both history and nature.

  8. says:

    When I saw Jim Jarmusch s film Paterson , I felt that I was seeing the last movie before our current, shit fueled moment of being ruled by a narcissistic, sociopathic, racist imbecile This book likewise feels like the last book written before Thatcherism It describes the enduring friendship of two boys, Bell Teesdale and Harry Bateman, who come from entirely different worlds the fells of Cumbria and middle class streets of London All parties are provincial and prejudiced, but they find that When I saw Jim Jarmusch s film Paterson , I felt that I was seeing the last movie before our current, shit fueled moment of being ruled by a narcissistic, sociopathic, racist imbecile This book likewise feels like the last book written before Thatcherism It describes the enduring friendship of two boys, Bell Teesdale and Harry Bateman, who come from entirely different worlds the fells of Cumbria and middle class streets of London All parties are provincial and prejudiced, but they find that the things they share in common far outweigh their differences This book is absolutely lovely

  9. says:

    Jane Gardam is a doyenne of British literature, better known there than in the U.S Her writing career is now over she s in her late eighties but what a grand career it s been Arguably among the best contributions in 20th century English literature is her trilogy Old Filth Filth means Failed in London, tried Hong Kong it s a masterpiece on relationships among a group of Brits and on British culture during and after WWII Gardam s ability to put you into the thoughts and feelings of her cha Jane Gardam is a doyenne of British literature, better known there than in the U.S Her writing career is now over she s in her late eighties but what a grand career it s been Arguably among the best contributions in 20th century English literature is her trilogy Old Filth Filth means Failed in London, tried Hong Kong it s a masterpiece on relationships among a group of Brits and on British culture during and after WWII Gardam s ability to put you into the thoughts and feelings of her characters is her best quality, enhanced by just magnificent writing OK, enough of the sales pitch The Hollow Land, a short 1982 novel, won the Whitbread Prize for Children s Literature, but don t dare let that turn you off The main protagonists are two young boys in a rural Cumbrian mining community mined areas are hollow land Filled with deserted houses as well as beauty, peace, and quiet, their little part of Britain is fast becoming a peaceful summer place for urban folk The Batemans are the latest of the urban swarm they arrive to rent one of the local houses, a house called Light Trees Light Trees is an extra house owned by the Teesdales, who have farmed the remote area since before elves planted gold Just up the road, at the end of the lane, is another house called Dark Trees.The first meeting of the families is a disaster Mr Bateman is a writer who is there for the quiet The first full day and night are ruined by clanking farm machinery and shouting voices as the Teesdales reap their hay crop rain is predicted and the crop must be brought in or be ruined The meeting of the cultures is unpleasant but very British no FU s shouted, no punches thrown An angry Mr Bateman decides to take his family back to London forthwith in his search for peace But during that brief episode of family tumult, eight year old Bell Teesdale and five year old Harry Bateman have made contact, sparking a lifelong relationship The precocious boys develop a plan to forestall disaster each will find a way to demonstrate to his parents that the other family has apologized Success Visits are made, amity is restored So begins a sweet novel about being young and discovering that although not everyone is like you they can still be likeable The book is less a novel that a series of vignettes detailing some episode in their joint life of the Batemans and Teesdales My favorite among many is titled The Household Word, in which a famous television interviewer visits with her eleven year old very sulky daughter A surprise ending begins a generations long meshing of the Bateman and the Teesdale families As the book regrettably ends, we are aware that there is a real life for all of us, and its not found in material things its called family At least in Britain My advice Read Jane Gardam The Hollow Land is a perfect appetizer, Old Filth is the perfect entr e, and dessert is the rest of the Old Filth Trilogy The Man with the Wooden Hat and Last Friends, in that order Five stars

  10. says:

    This is a series of related stories that take place in an isolated area of Westmorland which is, I believe, to the west of Yorkshire Having been to the dales and fells of Yorkshire, I think that Ms Gardam well describes the lay of the land But, in reality, her Westmorland is enchanted It is glorious with color and flowers and falls of icicles And the people are enchanted They seem living in a different time in different ways They are aware of the different people who have come across thei This is a series of related stories that take place in an isolated area of Westmorland which is, I believe, to the west of Yorkshire Having been to the dales and fells of Yorkshire, I think that Ms Gardam well describes the lay of the land But, in reality, her Westmorland is enchanted It is glorious with color and flowers and falls of icicles And the people are enchanted They seem living in a different time in different ways They are aware of the different people who have come across their lands Celts, Vikings, Saxons, Danes, modern day gypsies, and renters from London and these people are simply part of their world s diversity as if one could gossip about them or know them Additionally, they are also aware of legend and ghosts and the power of elemental forces.I am going on and on, but really I have to make two remarks about the scene The first is that Ms Gardam is such a skilled writer that these dales and fells are not romanticized, are not sweet Rather, they are beautiful, but by no means gentle Second, the scene is important because it is the backdrop to the relationships of the characters in these stories, to their different voices and individuality The main relationship is that between Harry, son of the London renters, and Bell, son of an old farming family These two meet as boys and have the life of boys They get themselves in bad trouble e.g., trapped in an old mine, lost in a blizzard , they are honest with each other, they cry in fear, they love and enjoy the wonders of the land In short, they are particularly good friends who they would not say it love each other and are bonded to the landscape and its ways Their growth and their attachment to the land is ultimately the subject of the stories Their adventures have a suspense and, yes, a poignancy that permeates the stories.Are these Chekhov Well, no But they are lovely

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *