A House of Pomegranates PDF å A House PDF/EPUB ²

A House of Pomegranates PDF å A House  PDF/EPUB ²
  • Paperback
  • 101 pages
  • A House of Pomegranates
  • Oscar Wilde
  • English
  • 10 November 2018
  • 1420927353

A House of Pomegranates✽ A House of Pomegranates kindle Epub ❁ Author Oscar Wilde – Essayreview.co.uk A House of Pomegranates is a collection of whimsical short stories by Oscar Wilde This collection includes the following tales The Young King The Birthday of the Infanta The Fisherman and his Soul The A House of Pomegranates is a collection of whimsical short stories by Oscar Wilde This collection includes the following tales The Young King The Birthday of the Infanta The Fisherman and his Soul The Star child Readers of all ages will be delighted by these fanciful A House PDF/EPUB ² tales.


About the Author: Oscar Wilde

Oscar Fingal O Flahertie Wills Wilde was an Irish playwright, poet, and author of numerous short stories, and one novel Known for his biting wit, and a plentitude of aphorisms, he became one of the most successful playwrights of the late Victorian era in London, and A House PDF/EPUB ² one of the greatest celebrities of his day Several of his plays continue to be widely performed, especially The Importance of Being Earnest As the result of a widely covered series of trials, Wilde suffered a dramatic downfall and was imprisoned for two years hard labour after being convicted of gross indecency with other men After Wilde was released from prison he set sail for Dieppe by the night ferry He never returned to Ireland or Britain, and died in poverty.


10 thoughts on “A House of Pomegranates

  1. says:

    Once upon a time there was a little collection of fairy tales called The House of Pomegranates by Oscar Wilde I opened this book up and found a whole different book than the one I had expected Is that a good or a bad thing Well, I suppose both.My familiarity with Mr Wilde is pretty much based on his decadent excoriation of decadence and beauty for beauty s sake The Picture of Dorian Gray and his brilliant and perfect and of course sublimely witty The Importance of Being Earnest I figured I Once upon a time there was a little collection of fairy tales called The House of Pomegranates by Oscar Wilde I opened this book up and found a whole different book than the one I had expected Is that a good or a bad thing Well, I suppose both.My familiarity with Mr Wilde is pretty much based on his decadent excoriation of decadence and beauty for beauty s sake The Picture of Dorian Gray and his brilliant and perfect and of course sublimely witty The Importance of Being Earnest I figured I would be gettingof the same, or at least a little of one and a lot of the other or some such combination Nope spoilers ahead The third story The Fisherman and His Soul is fascinating Starting off as a vaguely familiar tale of a lovelorn young fisherman who gives up his soul to be with the mermaid who has stolen his heart, it quickly moves in stranger directions There is a witch who falls in love with him, who brings him to a moonlit satanic ritual to meet her diabolical master, who declares her love and then shows him how to cut his soul free Then we learn about his cast out soul s journeys Such journeys The soul learns about Knowledge and Wealth and Lust And, most surprisingly, the soul has terrible powers and with those powers does terrible things A phrase uttered by the soul as he recounts his acts to the fisherman,And I did a strange thing, but what I did matters not , is repeated three times and it is unnerving, chilling Why does the soul do the terrible things it does Apparently because when the fisherman cleaved his soul from his body, his soul got none of his heart A heartless soul Strange His soul is soulless For some reason I have always identified the soul as equaling the heart, part of a kind of trinity Body, Mind, Soul Heart Wilde does not see it that way The soul returns to the fisherman repeatedly, telling him of his adventures, always trying to reunite with him in the same body And finally the soul does tempt the fisherman away from his undersea home, despite the peace and satisfaction that the fisherman has achieved with his mermaid love The soul leads the fisherman astray he compels him to do terrible and cruel and inexplicable things There is an unhappy ending And then there is a kind of happy ending, poetic and transcendent and, yes, strange What does it all mean Hard to say Of the four stories, this one reminded me the most of Dorian Gray, in its emphasis on decadence and on the idea of breaking up the psyche into different parts Elsewhere the spirit or soul is usually seen as a kind of agent of transcendence yet here it is the fisherman who has achieved true transcendence without his soul Perhaps the soul is the form of the fisherman s unconscious The fisherman reaches his own transcendence by achieving his strongest desire, by falling in love a love that is connected to his heart and one that is a palpably physical love The mermaid is described in language that defines her as a beautiful and very material being a body of ivory, a tail of silver and pearl, each separate hair a thread of gold What is Wilde saying That we can find our own riches in the physicality of love That we don t need those terrible adventures that force us to confront the true nature of Knowledge, Wealth, and Lust, that these are all Outside Forces that are in the end truly meaningless That the fisherman s soul journeys towards a kind of living death and, later, in his attempt to use good and evil to influence the fisherman that he is constructing a false binary of good vs evil, an ultimately meaningless duality That pure transcendence can be found in the romantic and sexual desires of eros, within the heart that acts as the fulcrum of the, er, pleasure principle Love the Id, and that s not so bad, not bad at all Or at least love equals whatever the id was considered to be, prior to Freud Sorry to bring up Freud, I know he s unpopular discredited all that, but the fisherman s actions do seem to exist as the opposite of Freud s reality principle in his disinterest in deferring gratification of his desires, in his rejection of the circumstantial and material reality that his village priest invokes to stop his quest to lose his own soul Is the heart the true agent of transcendence, one that is linked to regeneration The ending points me in that direction flowers blooming on unconsecrated ground, over the body of the dead fisherman a narrow minded priest suddenly finding himself lost in his own passionate moment of transcendence and connection to the beauty around him The first and fourth stories, The Young King and The Star Child are quite charming in their own way Certainly the prose is beautiful, jewel like One is the story of a young king who learns that to love the beauty of material goods is to support the enslavement and oppression of the people who create those goods in the end he achieves a glorious and godly transcendence in a church The other is the story of a child who is beautiful, vain, and cruel that child is transformed into an ugly creature and is then tormented until he achieves his own glorious and godly transcendence Charm and jewel like prose, yes, but I actively disliked both of these stories I don t have a problem with religious themes in my fiction I m a God lover myself, so bring it on But my God The messages in these two stories were so trite, so mawkish frankly, I became rather nauseated at the ever increasing relentlessness and obviousness of Wilde s goals in telling these tales All that charm became charmless Even worse, the themes of these particular tales almost act as a renunciation of some of the ideas present in the farcomplex and satisfying story of the fisherman The second story Birthday of the Infanta is a troubling and very intriguing little tale Lovely and grim in equal parts A Spanish princess, a king mourning the death murder of his wife, sinister courtiers who may have sinister designs on the royal child disturbing things bubbling away under the surface And then all of that is discarded as we learn the story of a dwarf brought to entertain the princess on her birthday His purity, his love, his connection to nature are all detailed movingly As is his lack of understanding in how he is viewed by those around him as an ugly joke In the end, after seeing his reflection in a mirrored wall and so learning his true place in the world of man, in the world of the princess he dies of a broken heart in front of his own image The meaning of the story seems timeless Unlike my experience with the two stories above, I was not remotely annoyed perhaps because the story is so bracing in its clear eyed sadness at the cruelty of the world A striking, resonant, and somewhat heartless ending after our little princess comes across the body of the good dwarf, she fails to understand that her toy has broken permanently and is annoyed when told that the death was due to a broken heartAnd the Infanta frowned, and her dainty rose leaf lips curled in pretty disdain For the future let those who come to play with me have no hearts, she cried, and she ran out into the garden. i found a lot of my own vague ideas given concrete form in Heather Marcovitch s excellent essay The Fisherman and His Soul and the Unconscious

  2. says:

    A House of Pomegranates is a collection of four fairy tales which were written by Oscar Wilde and published in 1891 It is regarded as a follow up to his first fairy tale collection The Happy Prince and Other Tales Wilde s success arose primarly from thinking of stories as things to tell It is hardly surprising His mother was an Irish folklorist He himself graduated in classical scholarship whose earliest texts were the oral narratives of a probably illiterate Homer It gave him a much m A House of Pomegranates is a collection of four fairy tales which were written by Oscar Wilde and published in 1891 It is regarded as a follow up to his first fairy tale collection The Happy Prince and Other Tales Wilde s success arose primarly from thinking of stories as things to tell It is hardly surprising His mother was an Irish folklorist He himself graduated in classical scholarship whose earliest texts were the oral narratives of a probably illiterate Homer It gave him a muchimmediate sense of audience than most writers. This does not necessarily mean that the stories were first told to his two sons, though simple versions may have been Cyril was almost three when the five stories in The Happy Prince and Other Tales were published in May 1888, Vyvyan one and a half But they were written with the intention of telling them to his sons.They are stories from an unselfconscious father who knows how to move the storyteller in and out of the narrative with mild self mockery Wilde is on the child s side but he knows the child will only be truly happy if it hates cruelty, treachery and poverty, if it loves loyalty, laughter and love The true folk story rejects any genre division between comedy and tragedy, and Wilde knew that there is no tragedy greater than that of the weeping clown It is not a wit which takes any pleasure in suffering and it holds out continual if desperate hopes for salvation.The stories of A House of Pomegranates turn on those hopes, the Dwarf and the Fisherman can only be saved by death itself, while the Young King can only find salvation by the recognition of suffering and the Star Child by himself suffering enough to cut short his life Wilde is a phenomenal storyteller but his strength definitely lays in the dialogue, not in description He has a great gift for varying voices and creating quotable moments The main reason why this collection fell a bit flat for me was its preachy narrative Spoilers ahead for the individual tales 1 The Young King 4.5 Stars Are not the rich and the poor brothers asked the young King Ay, answered the man, and the name of the rich brother is Cain The Young King tells the story of the illegitimate shepherd son of the recently dead king s daughter Being his only heir, the boy is about to get crowned king Being used to a lifestyle of poverty and starvation, the boy is in awe of his new luxurious home and the riches and raiment that come with it.During the night before his coronation he has three nightmares, each revolving around an element of his raiment his crown, scepter and robe , showing him where they came from and how they were obtained The first dream shows a group of starving peasants toiling hard to weave his robe without receiving payment The second dream shows a slave who is sent underwater to find pearls for the scepter and dies afterwards The third dream shows him the source of his crown s rubies In it, men excavate a dry riverbed in a tropical jungle, while overlooking them, the god Death ries to bargain with the goddess Avarice for a single grain of her corn Each time Avarice refuses, Death calls Ague, Fever and Plague to kill one third of her servants until she is left with nothing.On his coronation day, the Young King refuses to wear the raiment, and plucks himself a crown, a scepter and a robe from things he finds in the forest The nobles condemn him for bringing shame to their class, the peasants for trying to deprive them of work, and the bishops for foolishly trying to take the world s suffering upon himself The story ends with his approaching the altar, and his stick scepter blossoming with white lilies and his brier crown with red roses, and the bishop saying that God has officially crowned the Young King.I absolutely adored this tale It was beautifully written and had a message that I fully support you shouldn t exploit people, your outward appearance and status isn t as important as you think, and most importantly especially in tales written for children , good actions get rewarded in the end My favorite portion of this tale was definitely Death bargaining with Avarice It was so well executed by Oscar it was quite epic and it really corroborated his message that greedy people won t end up happy but alone in the end Additionally to that I found it really interesting to see Oscar s views on aestheticism in this children s tale as well he would wander from room to room, and from corridor to corridor, like on who was seeking to find in beauty an anodyne from pain, a sort of restoration from sickness 2 The Birthday of the Infanta 3 StarsThis tale is about a hunchbacked dwarf who gets sold to the palace for the amusement of the king s daughter, the Infanta, on her twelfth birthday.Her birthday is the only time she is allowed to play with other children and she much enjoys the performance of the dwarf The dwarf oblivious to the fact that the children and the rest of the audience were acutally laughing at him as he dances and performs, believes that the Infanta must love him and tries to seek her out after dinner He searches all the rooms but instead of discovering the Infanta, he stumbles upon a grotesque monster that mimicks his every move When the dwarf realizes that he is facing a mirror and therefore his own reflection, he realized that everyone had been mocking him, and he falls to the floor, kicking and screaming.When the Infanta and the other guests find him in this state on the floor, they think it s another perfomance and applaug him, when in fact the dwarf had died out of a broken heart The tale ends with the Infanta telling her servant For the future, let those who come to play with me have no hearts The narrative itself didn t blew my socks off but I liked the fact that in the beginning of the story the dwarf wasn t aware of how he looked because he grew up impoverished in the woods and this unawareness contributed to his happiness he couldn t be shallow, he couldn t be vain because looks simply didn t matter to him By contrast, the people in the palace who are muchprivileged and educated, are muchjudgmental and define their happiness by how they look and what they have Oscar makes it very clear despite the fact that the dwarf dies in the end that those are the bad people, and that the dwarf is pure at heart and deserved much better 3 The Fisherman and his Soul 3 StarsIn order to live with the love of his life a mermaid , the young fisherman gives up his soul to live underwater In order to give it up he has to cut his shadow and free his soul The fisherman, however, refuses to give his Soul his heart, because he wants to save it for his mermaid, and sends the Soul away without it.Each year that passes, the Soul visits the Fisherman and tells him of all the different places that it had visited In the first year, the Soul had come into the possession of the Mirror of Wisdom, in the second year, the Ring of Riches Both times the Soul tries to tempt the Fisherman with accepting these objects and therefore taking his Soul back into his body Both times, the Fisherman refuses because he thinks that love isimportant than wisdom or wealth.However, in the third year the Soul tempts him with a woman who dances barefoot in a nearby city The fisherman really wants to see her dance and invites his Soul back into his body Passing through the cities on the way, the Soul tells the Fisherman to do things steal a silver cup, beat a child and kill a man who just gave them shelter The Fisherman horried by the power the Soul has over his body, confronts the Soul about these actions the Soul reminds him that he had not given it a heart.When the Fisherman tries to part from his Soul again, he learns that that is no longer possible, and he is therefore not able to return to his love underwater In desperation he builds a shelter near the water and calls the Mermaid daily, but she never comes After a year passes, the lifeless body of the Mermaid washes ashore, and while holding her in his arms, the waves envelope and drown him.A priest, finding the drowned lovers, pronounces them accursed and buries them in an unmarked, and refuses to bless the water which was his initial intent Three years later, the priest finds the grave covered in flowers, and is unable to give his sermon on God s vengeful wrath, and instead speaks of God s love 4 The Star Child 2 StarsAs a baby the Star Child was abandoned in the woods and taken in by a poor woodcutter When he grows up to be exceedingly beautiful, he grows vain, cruel and arrogant One day, an old beggar woman reveals to him that he is her mother Disgusted by her appearance the Star Child rejects her, and is punished and turned into an ugly toad snake like creature He sets off to seek forgiveness from his mother and all the animals he has tortured.At length, he comes to a ctiy, where he is captured and sold into slavery His master sets him the task of finding three pieces of gold hidden in the forest With the help of a rabbit, the Star Child manages to find a piece each day, but whenever he returns to the city, he stumbles upon a beggar who tells him that he will starve if the Star Child doesn t surrender the gold to him When the Star Child returns empty handed, his master beats him cruelly.Before setting out to find the third and last piece of gold, his master told him that he would kill him if he comes back without it But after finding it and being confronted with the beggar again, he gives up the piece of gold nonetheless, deciding that the beggar s life is worththan his own s.Upon entering the city, everyone awaits him to crown him the new king, and he discovers the city s present rulers to be his mother, the beggar woman, and his father, the beggar he had given the gold to At that point also, he is transformed to his former beautiful self At the story s end, we are told of his kind, loving, and charitable reign, but that it only lasted for three years, and the king that followed him was cruel and evil.The ending was extremely abrupt and overall I wasn t the biggest fan of the story, it semed extremely generic and rushed to me The weakest one of the collection in my opinion

  3. says:

    2.5 Stars Oscar Wilde s other short stories Sadly, this is definitely my least favourite work by Wilde so far and I only have his poems and essays left to read, which aren t really comparable , and the only one that I haven t really liked which, on the bright side, says something about the quality of his work overall These stories were all hard for me to get into, and I found them rather dull and preachy The Young King 2 Stars The Birthday of the Infanta 2 Stars The Fisherma 2.5 Stars Oscar Wilde s other short stories Sadly, this is definitely my least favourite work by Wilde so far and I only have his poems and essays left to read, which aren t really comparable , and the only one that I haven t really liked which, on the bright side, says something about the quality of his work overall These stories were all hard for me to get into, and I found them rather dull and preachy The Young King 2 Stars The Birthday of the Infanta 2 Stars The Fisherman and His Soul 3 Stars The Star Child 3 Stars

  4. says:

    Four Fairy Tales a la WildeYes, Oscar Wilde wrote children s stories and I was amazed the first time I found out These definitely follow aold fashioned, pre Disney trajectory for fairy tales Happiness is not the objective, moral edification is and thus, often rather sad THE YOUNG KINGThis is meant to be a Christian parable, but the young king reminded meof Siddhartha Buddha Beautiful language and imagery with a moral.THE BIRTHDAY OF THE INFANTAThis is the life of the Princess of Four Fairy Tales a la WildeYes, Oscar Wilde wrote children s stories and I was amazed the first time I found out These definitely follow aold fashioned, pre Disney trajectory for fairy tales Happiness is not the objective, moral edification is and thus, often rather sad THE YOUNG KINGThis is meant to be a Christian parable, but the young king reminded meof Siddhartha Buddha Beautiful language and imagery with a moral.THE BIRTHDAY OF THE INFANTAThis is the life of the Princess of Spain with all the beauty, pageantry, and displays of power at the forefront Again, Wilde give stunning descriptions of the surroundings and a fair rendering of both the people and the environment Indeed, I was reminded of Velasquez s painting while reading this The parable here revolves around the careless cruelty innate to absolute power.THE FISHERMAN AND HIS SOULRather depressing and morbid What does a soul do when left to its own devices THE STAR CHILDRedemption with messianic undercurrent Fascinating to read something completely different by Wilde Old fashion fairy tales with morals, didactic and strong religious overtones While Wilde wrote about his own struggles in other books, notably De Profundis, I can t say these are singularly Christian There is a syncretism, then again, Christianity is syncretic so it s hard for me to determine if this is deliberately a blend or merely an expression of Wilde s exposure.Found this lingering on my currently reading shelf and decided to finish it off While interesting, I don t think I d reread it and though beautiful not what I d consider children s fare, today

  5. says:

    Like Grimm s Tales only much much much better and farinteresting Great.

  6. says:

    Intended neither for the British child nor the British public A House of Pomegranatesconsists of four fairy tales written by Oscar Wilde and released in 1891 as a sequel to the collection, The Happy Prince and Other Tales.This anthology was printed in the same year as the complete, uncensored version of Wilde s barely disguised homoerotic novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, which was unleashed on a scandalised British readership to strident accusations of effeminacy and moral depravityIntended neither for the British child nor the British public A House of Pomegranatesconsists of four fairy tales written by Oscar Wilde and released in 1891 as a sequel to the collection, The Happy Prince and Other Tales.This anthology was printed in the same year as the complete, uncensored version of Wilde s barely disguised homoerotic novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, which was unleashed on a scandalised British readership to strident accusations of effeminacy and moral depravity The critics savaged his plot in which a young man s portrait is painted by an artist infatuated by his beauty the protagonist making a Faustian bargain with the devil in order to ensure the picture, rather than he, will age and decline with the passing of time.At this juncture, Wilde was living with his wife and two sons on Chelsea s fashionable Tite Street, and regularly wrote fantasy fiction for magazines He was a famous man about town, but also visited Paris, where he was received as a respected writer at the salons litt raires. It was in this already hectic year that he was first introduced to Lord Alfred Douglas known as Bosie , a handsome but somewhat spoilt young fellow who famously became the older man s lover, close companion and the catalyst to his eventual ruination.Wilde s short stories, which were marketed as children s fiction, have inevitably been overshadowed by his clever and amusing plays They are lyrically beguiling allegories, but in much the same wayGrimm s Fairy Talescould never be described as happy ever after narratives, the tales inA House of Pomegranatestend to be pessimistic, devoid of solace and typically non judgemental One wonders if they were in fact written with youngsters in mind.This collection there were three all told , is dedicated to his wife, Constance, and contains The Young King, The Birthday of the Infanta, The Fisherman and his Soul, and The Star Child. They are whimsical, poignant and a touch satiricalGothic suspense than juvenile literature but nevertheless a real delight for this adultMy roses are redder than the great fans of coral that wave and wave in the ocean cavernYou can read manyof my reviews and other literary features at Book Jotter

  7. says:

    I really love reading Oscar Wilde s short stories and this is no exception.

  8. says:

    Not sure if awesome,or just plain brilliant.No, really not I love the whole Good looks don t make you a good person Take that, Disney and stuff, but I m not sure how I can view this So many people suffered in all four stories, and I kinda just wanted to jump in and hit Wilde over the head with my linguistics textbook, but of course that would have made all those stories for naught, and then I would hit him over the head with my linguistics textbook for not providing good stories, and then Not sure if awesome,or just plain brilliant.No, really not I love the whole Good looks don t make you a good person Take that, Disney and stuff, but I m not sure how I can view this So many people suffered in all four stories, and I kinda just wanted to jump in and hit Wilde over the head with my linguistics textbook, but of course that would have made all those stories for naught, and then I would hit him over the head with my linguistics textbook for not providing good stories, and then I expect he would hit me with his cane Or he would use wit Wit is effective Lina is confused Wild Wilde ran away pok speech What I absolutely like is that somehow all those stories seem so similar to some fairytales, yet are written in their own wilde way No pun well, yeah, pun intended.The Young King 4 5 I don t exactly remember a fairytale with a young king, but I m pretty sure there is one Yet, this young king goes from I love it all because it s pretty to I hate it all because it s pretty to Holy lord blabla oh where did that fancy robe come from Sweet, in a way, but not my favourite.The Birthday of the Infanta 4 5 Oh Dear Scott What a spoiled brat There you go, daddy king, this is what happens if all you do is cry over your deceased queen The middle age kings and queens would have caned that brat for her blatant non existence of milte milte was considered one of the most important characteristics of a rich and or noble person in the middle ages, very much so in the Middle High German speaking part of it, which was quite a big one It basically means to give to the poor and show kindness and be generous, without exaggerating it, of course Everything in moderation, cept when you were writing minnesongs No, that wasn t necessary to throw in, but I like to boast my knowledge around, because yes, I m that boastful The poor little actual main protagonist_.The Fisherman and his Soul 4 5 I first thought of the Fisherman and his wife, and I think it has some similarities Quite a fancy fish he fished himself there , but overall of course it s different What I really like about this one is that everyone seems so human, even though some of them wander around and do horribly awful bad stuff But mostly I like this because it made me think about a story I m writing myself, and I know I should get going with it _The Star Child 5 5 This one I like the most It s so typical of people to feel entitled over others when they consider themselvesbeautifil than those others, and they do need a taste of that bitter medicine themselves But it is also so human, and overall, I found the Star Child to be the most appealing character out of the whole four stories, aside from the Witch out of the third Towards the end I kept thinking Wait, that s not some kind of ruse, is it If this is some kind of ruse I will scream but it wasn t a ruse, and I underestimated Wilde s brilliance, and I need to go hit myself with my linguistics textbook for that

  9. says:

    Oscar Wilde might just be the greatest fiction writer of all time Having said that, it s a pity there are so few of his works He certainly has a very special place in my heart, and this collection of beautiful children s stories show just how talented he really was Wilde is famous for his epigrams and his razor sharp wit His command of the English language made him a literary trend setter Yet these innocent fables allow people to see a lesser known side of him, ahuman side a glimps Oscar Wilde might just be the greatest fiction writer of all time Having said that, it s a pity there are so few of his works He certainly has a very special place in my heart, and this collection of beautiful children s stories show just how talented he really was Wilde is famous for his epigrams and his razor sharp wit His command of the English language made him a literary trend setter Yet these innocent fables allow people to see a lesser known side of him, ahuman side a glimpse of the mortal As mercurial and glamorous as he was or made himself out to be , the work he produced here for younger audiences stands as a hommage for ancient story telling that reaches out to the likes of Hans Christian Anderson or the Brother s Grimm In fact these aren t mere stories, but rather fables , and unfortunately fables are an almost extinct form of story telling these days When people think of Oscar Wilde, no one ever thinks of morals, yet these tales each hold a deep moral lesson The Star Child is rather like Dorian Gray re worked for children, in that it warns them of the dangers of vanity and to respect ones elders The Mermaids Soul explores the rather complex issue of the soul, or rather the difference of making decisions with your head or your senses, and how one must have a little of both facilities in, otherwise chaos ensues The most famous of this bunch is probably The Happy Prince , who when I first read it many moons ago mistook it for an Andersen fable My favourite, The Infanta , is about innocent ignorance, class divide, love and mercy It teaches us NOT to judge by appearances, and to accept people as they are Wilde was famed as an aesthete, yet in all his stories there is a very firm dislike of articifice, and a reverence of the beauty of the soul as opposed to the flesh Even though this is blatantly obvious in his writing, people still insist on ignoring it, which is sad Judging by these stories and stories are a window to the soul I think Wilde was a deeply moral man whose choices in life must have pained him given the social cultural atmosphere of the time.This collection would make a wonderful gift for any child I read the Gutenberg ebook version, which unfortunately didn t have the titles, but rather interestingly had a dedication at the beginning of each story telling the reader who it was written for I think The House of Pomegranates is a real gem of a book I m glad I rediscovered it this year It is absolute story perfection

  10. says:

    Fourshort stories by Oscar Wilde and I m done with this author For the next years A House of Pomegranates is a collection of four rather short fairy tales I cannot say I enjoyed them Despite the fantastic details of these stories, there was some kind of moralism that I didn t find interesting It wasn t exactly the moral of each story, but the way things were put As with the previous book, I felt that Wilde managed to spoil what had potential to be a nice story And this happened wit Fourshort stories by Oscar Wilde and I m done with this author For the next years A House of Pomegranates is a collection of four rather short fairy tales I cannot say I enjoyed them Despite the fantastic details of these stories, there was some kind of moralism that I didn t find interesting It wasn t exactly the moral of each story, but the way things were put As with the previous book, I felt that Wilde managed to spoil what had potential to be a nice story And this happened with the four in this book

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