The Yellow Cross: The Story of the Last Cathars' Rebellion
    The Yellow Cross: The Story of the Last Cathars' Rebellion contradicted the tenets set forth by Rome, found themselves the focus of ruthless repression In systematic waves of brutal persecution, thousands of Cathars were captured, summarily tried, and burned at the stake as heretics Yet so ardent was their faith that during the yearsto , the Cathars rose up one last time Ren Weis tells the dramatic and moving story of these thirty years, offering a rich medieval tale of faith, adventure, sex, and courage Having spent years exploring a rich trove of untouched information, including trial records and interrogation transcripts, Weis creates a remarkably detailed portrait of the last great gasp of the movement and the day to day life of the individual Cathars in their villages This is an exceptionally vivid re creation of a fascinating, and otherwise lost, world."/>
  • Paperback
  • 468 pages
  • The Yellow Cross: The Story of the Last Cathars' Rebellion Against the Inquisition, 1290-1329
  • René Weis
  • English
  • 02 July 2018
  • 0375704418

The Yellow Cross: The Story of the Last Cathars' Rebellion Against the Inquisition, 1290-1329[Reading] ➺ The Yellow Cross: The Story of the Last Cathars' Rebellion Against the Inquisition, 1290-1329 ➰ René Weis – Essayreview.co.uk The Yellow Crossis a harrowing tale of a desperate people in a small corner of France who defied the kings of Europe and the Pope The Cathars, whose religion was based on the Gospels but contradicted The Yellow Crossis a harrowing Cross: The PDF/EPUB ¼ tale of a desperate people in The Yellow PDF or a small corner of France who defied the kings of Europe and Yellow Cross: The MOBI ☆ the Pope The Cathars, whose religion was based on the Gospels but contradicted the tenets set forth by Rome, found themselves the focus of ruthless repression In systematic waves of brutal persecution, thousands of Cathars were captured, summarily tried, and burned at the stake as heretics Yet so ardent was their faith that during the yearsto , the Cathars rose up one last time Ren Weis tells the dramatic and moving story of these thirty years, offering a rich medieval tale of faith, adventure, sex, and courage Having spent years exploring a rich trove of untouched information, including trial records and interrogation transcripts, Weis creates a remarkably detailed portrait of the last great gasp of the movement and the day to day life of the individual Cathars in their villages This is an exceptionally vivid re creation of a fascinating, and otherwise lost, world.


About the Author: René Weis

Ren Weis is a freelance Cross: The PDF/EPUB ¼ author and Professor of English at The Yellow PDF or University College London He has a written on a wide variety of Yellow Cross: The MOBI ☆ subjects, including Edith Thompson of the infamous Thompson and Bywaters murder case in the s , the last Cathar insurgency in the Pyrenees in the Middle Ages, and a biography of Shakespeare As a professional Shakespearian, he has published extensively on Shakespeare and Renaissance drama, his publications including editions of Romeo and Juliet, King Lear, Henry IV Part , and an Oxford World s Classics edition of the works of John Webster A lifelong lover of opera, he also contributes regular pieces to the programmes for Royal Opera House productions.


10 thoughts on “The Yellow Cross: The Story of the Last Cathars' Rebellion Against the Inquisition, 1290-1329

  1. says:

    Montaillou is a village in the Ari ge region of southern France which was the site in the early fourteen century of one of the last campaigns by the Catholic inquisition against the Cathar or Albigensian heresy Fortunately the records of the chief inquisitor, Jacque Fournier, who later became Pope Benedict XII, were preserved in the Vatican Library and the verbatim interrogations of about 90 suspects from the village and surroundings survived In the last century they were edited and later tran Montaillou is a village in the Ari ge region of southern France which was the site in the early fourteen century of one of the last campaigns by the Catholic inquisition against the Cathar or Albigensian heresy Fortunately the records of the chief inquisitor, Jacque Fournier, who later became Pope Benedict XII, were preserved in the Vatican Library and the verbatim interrogations of about 90 suspects from the village and surroundings survived In the last century they were edited and later translated into modern French by Jean Duvernoy and served as the basis for Emmanuel Le Roi Ladurie s Montailou The Promised Land of Error As a result, we are able to knowabout the intimate lives of these victims of religious persecution than about any other group of Medieval people.But Duvernoy was a documentary historian and Ladurie belonged to the Annals group, neither was a narrative historian, so the reader interested in the lives of these and how they practiced their religion and tried to evade the clutches of the Catholic inquisition will enjoy this book It is an exciting tale theauthor gives us in The Yellow Cross Interesting that both the Nazis and the Catholics required their victims to wear yellow badges He visited all the sites where critical incidents took place, traveling in rough weather and tough country The Cather hierarchy were called Perfects who their own version of last rites, the Consolamentum Often they journeyedthan thirty miles in one night to reach the bedside of the dying, aided by a system of trusted local guides, and provided with lodging in secret rooms in safe houses inhabited by believers credentes.It is fascinating to compare their stories both with Roman Catholic recusants in Elizabethan England and with the history of the French r sistance during the German Occupation, all in the face of arrest, interrogation, torture, and death Though actual burning as the stake were rare and reserved for heretics who refused to abjure their fatith And in all three there were spies eager to denounce them, double and even triple agents the demon priest Pierre Clergue was both the rector of the parish and supported the Cathars, as well with his brothers running a protection racket that could allow the accused to bribe their way out of prison, as well as being sexually insatiable The accused ranged from shepherds to the minor aristocracy and it s striking that the same regions were centers of Protestantism during the Reformation and resistance during the Second World War I expect the mountainous geography and isolation encouraged independence and resistance to authority The ability of the good men or good Christians to gain the loyalty of followers over a couple of hundred years in the face of persecution may tell us something about their ability of relate to ordinary people Their missionary methods resembled muchthat practice of early Christians than the official Church, with its reliance on the power and authority of the state and persecution This is both an intriguing adventure story and an inspiring tale of spiritual courage in the face of persecution and oppression

  2. says:

    c2000 For a non fiction book, this was utterly absorbing as per the quote from the Daily Telegraph Five words from the blurb heretical bloodshed gripping Vatican exterminating I did like the way that the author interspersed the factual recountings of the story of the last Cathars with his own personal observations and travels I found it incredibly difficult to sort through the persona dramitis as there were so many similar names and surnames to battle through However, that is the sam c2000 For a non fiction book, this was utterly absorbing as per the quote from the Daily Telegraph Five words from the blurb heretical bloodshed gripping Vatican exterminating I did like the way that the author interspersed the factual recountings of the story of the last Cathars with his own personal observations and travels I found it incredibly difficult to sort through the persona dramitis as there were so many similar names and surnames to battle through However, that is the same for much of history I know one person who is always totally confused with the two Cromwells Oliver vs Thomas that pitch up at various stages of English history So, the combination of commonality and unusual and archaic names did make it a trifle hard going and that is, by no means, the fault of the author There is so much interesting information about the Cathars and religion in this age that it is worthwhile wading through the names The map of the towns were useful and, in my opinion, a family tree or linked connection map of the various families may have made it all a bit easier The writing is straightforward but there are some wonderful quips as well I enjoyed the recounting of the various things that happened to the main Catholic Fournier Extremely ironic as was the cause of his death gangrene not a pleasant ending at all especially in those days In the ensuing years they zealously littered the country with yellow crosses, the symbol of shame which those regarded as heretics were forced to wear on their tunics and coats..Moreover they were instructed not to move about either inside or outside their houses without openly displaying the crosses Remind you of anything Recommended

  3. says:

    This book is a marvel of scholarship and research about the last days of Catharism in the Languedoc area of southern France in the early 14th Century The sheer volume of detail about personalities, events, and relationships that the author was able to glean from, mainly, records of peoples testimonies before the Inquisition would be amazing if it dealt with events from 50 years ago that these events took place almost 700 years ago makes it all theastonishing.Unfortunately the book is al This book is a marvel of scholarship and research about the last days of Catharism in the Languedoc area of southern France in the early 14th Century The sheer volume of detail about personalities, events, and relationships that the author was able to glean from, mainly, records of peoples testimonies before the Inquisition would be amazing if it dealt with events from 50 years ago that these events took place almost 700 years ago makes it all theastonishing.Unfortunately the book is almost impossible to read In large part this is because of the very large cast of characters, and the fact that they have very similar names Most of them have one of only about half a dozen surnames Clergue, Authie, Maury, Maurs, Rives, or Baille and a seemingly even smaller set of Christian names, especially for the men The number of Pierres, Arnauds, and Guillaumes is impenetrable The author also chose to make many references to events or people who were to come later in the narrative, but who had not yet been introduced This jumpy timeline might be all right for someone who was already pretty familiar with the general flow of events in the 30 or so years that the narrative covers but for a novice it makes it impossible to get a feel for the overall timeline.What you get from reading this book is a wonderful detailed impression of life in small mountain towns and villages in mountainous southwest France in 1290 1320, with its daily chores, family feuds and alliances, employment opportunities, and the vague terror of being persecuted for your beliefs by a powerful church whose authority in your remote area was tenuous This extended to having to be careful about who you assumed to be of your heresy, to the point of having to work out a whole jargon to allow you test someone beliefs without betraying your own You also learn a number of Cathar ceremonies and beliefs, and how some of those beliefs such as the tenet that all sex was sin, and sex within marriage the most sinful of all influenced the behavior and culture of the heavily Cathar regions.What you don t get from this book is a feel for the general rise and spread of Catharism, and how it came to be concentrated in the Languedoc and adjacent regions of Catalonia and Northern Italy To be fair, the book never promises this, as it correctly claims to be focused on the suppression of the last outburst of Cathar heresy between about 1290 and 1325 but finishing The Yellow Cross made me want to find ageneral history of Catharism with a little less detail and a little smoother narrative style.One final note this book is replete with maps, which I found enchanting and laudable Almost every location mentioned in the text is on at least one map, and maps overlap nicely for a comprehensive geographical picture of the area and the journeys of the principal subjects The historical and in some cases, somewhat conjectural maps of the villages, with long gone houses of individual families shown, are not only beautiful works of diagramming but of historical research, and I loved them

  4. says:

    A really interesting and informative read about the last of the Cathars The people who feature in this story are very diverse and most are not that devout, either as Cathars or Catholics lots of people using religion to control people and further their own interests.

  5. says:

    A very interesting book on a period of history that is often overlooked I was amazed at the amount of detail that had been recorded in the archives.

  6. says:

    Au sens o Edgar Morin voque la complexit comme substitut d une impossible totalit L inquisition, pour reprendre la probl matique ainsi mise en oeuvre, l Inquisition tant t calomnie, tortures en main, et tant t r fracte, ou refl te vraiment Le catharisme, qui fournit un mod le moral et spirituel dont l id alisme a rarement t gal dans l histoire de l Europe, brille au contraire comme un phare au milieu des t n bres La lumi re est venue dans le monde, et les hommes ont mieux aim Au sens o Edgar Morin voque la complexit comme substitut d une impossible totalit L inquisition, pour reprendre la probl matique ainsi mise en oeuvre, l Inquisition tant t calomnie, tortures en main, et tant t r fracte, ou refl te vraiment Le catharisme, qui fournit un mod le moral et spirituel dont l id alisme a rarement t gal dans l histoire de l Europe, brille au contraire comme un phare au milieu des t n bres La lumi re est venue dans le monde, et les hommes ont mieux aim les t n bres que la lumi re, parce que leurs oeuvres taient mauvaises En effet, quiconque fait le mal hait la lumi re et ne vient pas la lumi re, de peur que ses oeuvres ne soient d voil es mais celui qui agit dans la v rit vient la lumi re, pour qu il apparaisse au grand jour que ses oeuvres sont faites en Dieu 3,19 21 Ce contraste entre lumi re et obscurit est pr cis ment celui auquel recouraient les cathares pour opposer leur doctrine celle de l glise tablie L image en est probablement emprunt e l vangile selon saint Jean, le texte biblique qui les inspira entre tous Au commencement le Verbe tait , pouvaient ils lire au premier verset de saint Jean Et le verbe s est fait chair et il a demeur parmi nous, et nous avons vu sa gloire, gloire qu il tient de son P re comme Fils unique 1,14 Les Cathares ainsi qu on les d nommait, croyaient que le diable tait co ternel Dieu et que le monde mat riel et la chair taient son oeuvre pernicieuse si un homme ou une femme mourait sans avoir re u la consolation, son me tait destin e migrer dans une autre cr ature vivante, animale ou humaine,Les cathares refusent toute forme d atteinte la vie, tant humaine qu animale sans tre un passeport pour le paradis, la consolation avait pour but d en faciliter l acc s, et elle vitait celui qui la recevait de passer par une autre r incarnation dans ce monde l antipathie des cathares l gard du corps humain tait solidement enracin e dans leur m taphysique selon laquelle les mes, apr s leur chute originelle hors du paradis, furent rev tues par le diable de tuniques ou emprisonn es dans des corps Pour les croyants cathares, le monde physique tait plein d mes errantes la recherche de la bonne incarnation qui les conduirait au salut La th ologie cathare fut peut tre influenc e quant elle par la m taphysique orientale Du moins nos h r tiques taient ils, au risque cette fois de susciter l admiration, des non violents, victimes de divers pers cuteurs infiniment plus adonn s la violence, en effet, Le Catharisme avait t contenu, mais non radiqu , par les croisades royales Double jeu du cur Clergue, crisique souhait, entre les diverses factions de sa paroisse, maffia pro carcassonnaise et cabale appam enne Mitterand donc avait soulign , durant ce repas, que Pierre Clergue tait un collaborateur, se comportant comme tel manoeuvrant entre ses amis, ses ennemis et la puissance occupante ou tout le moins dominante de la France, lourdement pr sente Carcassonne et en Languedoc autour de 1300 Mitterand sans nul doute, se souvenait sur ce point des difficiles exp riences qui furent les siennes en 1942 1944 Vichy puis Paris et enfin l ext rieur des territoires europ ens contr l s par l Allemagne

  7. says:

    Written like a very long essay, this detailed view of an underground religious movement, was strangely compelling My main complaint was that the writer did not make it easy to follow the connections between people Giving them lengthy titles, such as mother s brother s daughter instead of just saying niece You just could not follow that aspect of it easily There are very few Christian names in Catalonia so everyone was pretty much called the same In the end I ignored the who and concentr Written like a very long essay, this detailed view of an underground religious movement, was strangely compelling My main complaint was that the writer did not make it easy to follow the connections between people Giving them lengthy titles, such as mother s brother s daughter instead of just saying niece You just could not follow that aspect of it easily There are very few Christian names in Catalonia so everyone was pretty much called the same In the end I ignored the who and concentrated on the incidents

  8. says:

    A thoroughly investigated and fluently written story about the last stronghold of the Cathars in the south east of France The author followed in their footsteps and made the main characters come alive, which is a big accomplishment considering there are 6 centuries between us and them.The only problem I had in reading this book is keeping track of all the people mentioned, despite the very clear maps I applaud the maps, they were very good and helpful in visualising the events and surroundings A thoroughly investigated and fluently written story about the last stronghold of the Cathars in the south east of France The author followed in their footsteps and made the main characters come alive, which is a big accomplishment considering there are 6 centuries between us and them.The only problem I had in reading this book is keeping track of all the people mentioned, despite the very clear maps I applaud the maps, they were very good and helpful in visualising the events and surroundings

  9. says:

    If you enjoy reading history, try this.

  10. says:

    Detailed, thorough, dense I probably read it too early into my Cathar journey.

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