Paperback ¶ Pomegranate Soup eBook Á

Paperback  ¶ Pomegranate Soup eBook Á
    IGNOU books 2019 In Hindi Online PDF Free the transformation in her sisters Young Layla finds first love, and even tense, haunted Bahar seems to be less nervous And in the stand up comedian turned priest Father Fergal Mahoney, the gentle, lonely widow Estelle Delmonico, and the headstrong hairdresser Fiona Athey, the sisters find a merry band of supporters against the close minded opposition of less welcoming villagers stuck in their ways But the idyll is soon broken when the past rushes back to threaten the Amnipours once , and the lives they left behind in revolution era Iran bleed into the present Infused with the textures and scents, trials and triumph,s of two distinct cultures, Pomegranate Soup is an infectious novel of magical realism This richly detailed story, highlighted with delicious recipes, is a delectable journey into the heart of Persian cooking and Irish living."/>
  • Paperback
  • 256 pages
  • Pomegranate Soup
  • Marsha Mehran
  • English
  • 12 June 2019
  • 0812972481

Pomegranate Soup❰PDF / Epub❯ ☂ Pomegranate Soup Author Marsha Mehran – Essayreview.co.uk Beneath the holy mountain Croagh Patrick, in damp and lovely County Mayo, sits the small, sheltered village of Ballinacroagh To the exotic Aminpour sisters, Ireland looks like a much needed safe haven Beneath the holy mountain Croagh Patrick, in damp and lovely County Mayo, sits the small, sheltered village of Ballinacroagh To the exotic Aminpour sisters, Ireland looks like a much needed safe haven It has been seven years since Marjan Aminpour fled Iran with her younger sisters, Bahar and Layla, and she hopes that in Ballinacroagh, a land of crazed sheep and dizzying roads, they might finally find a homeFrom the kitchen of an old pastry shop on Main Mall, the sisters set about creating a Persian oasis Soon sensuous wafts of cardamom, cinnamon, and saffron float through the streets an exotic aroma that announces the opening of the Babylon Caf , and a shock to a town that generally subsists on boiled cabbage and Guinness served at the local tavern And it is an affront to the senses of Ballinacroagh s uncrowned king, Thomas McGuire After trying to buy the old pastry shop for years and failing, Thomas is enraged to find it occupied and by foreigners, no less But the mysterious, spicy fragrances work their magic on the townsfolk, and soon, business is booming Marjan is thrilled with the demand for her red lentil soup, abgusht stew, and rosewater baklava and with the transformation in her sisters Young Layla finds first love, and even tense, haunted Bahar seems to be less nervous And in the stand up comedian turned priest Father Fergal Mahoney, the gentle, lonely widow Estelle Delmonico, and the headstrong hairdresser Fiona Athey, the sisters find a merry band of supporters against the close minded opposition of less welcoming villagers stuck in their ways But the idyll is soon broken when the past rushes back to threaten the Amnipours once , and the lives they left behind in revolution era Iran bleed into the present Infused with the textures and scents, trials and triumph,s of two distinct cultures, Pomegranate Soup is an infectious novel of magical realism This richly detailed story, highlighted with delicious recipes, is a delectable journey into the heart of Persian cooking and Irish living.


About the Author: Marsha Mehran

Marsha Mehran escaped the upheaval of the Iranian revolution with her family She grew up in the United States, Australia and Argentina, where her parents operated a Middle Eastern caf She lived in both Brooklyn and Ireland.


10 thoughts on “Pomegranate Soup

  1. says:

    I hated every second of this pseudo magic realist ouevre The writing is trying so hard to be eloquent and poetic but it s totally Hallmark The writer graduated from the adjective school of writing Yuck Then again it s an easy read if you re in bed with the flu.on the plus side great recipes little glimpse into both Iranian and Irish life.

  2. says:

    This book was very wonderful for what it was a delicious mixture of food and the personal journeys of three sisters who escape Iran on the eve of the revolution and eventually make their way to Ireland This book pleasantly reminded me of another book about the magic of food from another culture The Mistress of Spices We learn of the sisters experiences in Iran through flashbacks throughout the book, and I really appreciated Mehran s light touch in her descriptions of the sisters painful me This book was very wonderful for what it was a delicious mixture of food and the personal journeys of three sisters who escape Iran on the eve of the revolution and eventually make their way to Ireland This book pleasantly reminded me of another book about the magic of food from another culture The Mistress of Spices We learn of the sisters experiences in Iran through flashbacks throughout the book, and I really appreciated Mehran s light touch in her descriptions of the sisters painful memories In my opinion, too many books are heavy handed and overwhelming with sadness when they flashback to such events Mehran had just the right combination of sadness and facts that made me want to learnabout this terrible time in Iran, but did not frighten me away from the violent history In Ireland, the sumptuous exotic spices of the sisters cooking reinvigorate the aspirations of the townsfolk in Ballinacroagh and bring them together I of course was hungry the entire time reading the book and would love to try some of the recipes that Mehran includes before every chapter A yummy light read that delivered all it promised I am looking forward to discussing it at my book club on Monday and will post any other revelations our discussion brings On a happy note, this might be my most successful book club pick ever thanks Holyn for joining GoodReads so I could read your review

  3. says:

    This book languished on my TBR for 8 years while I waited for the right time to read it Luckily for me, that time is now, because I really liked it and have now replaced it on my list with its sequel Rosewater and Soda Bread.In a nutshell, 3 Iranian refugee sisters arrive in a small Irish village in the mid 1980s, and open a cafe showcasing Persian cuisine Some villagers are welcoming, others are suspicious, and stillare downright nasty towards the sisters But these young women have sur This book languished on my TBR for 8 years while I waited for the right time to read it Luckily for me, that time is now, because I really liked it and have now replaced it on my list with its sequel Rosewater and Soda Bread.In a nutshell, 3 Iranian refugee sisters arrive in a small Irish village in the mid 1980s, and open a cafe showcasing Persian cuisine Some villagers are welcoming, others are suspicious, and stillare downright nasty towards the sisters But these young women have survived and escaped a revolution in their homeland, so there s not much the Irish villagers could do to them to put them off their dream of a safe and quiet life in the Irish countryside That s not to say that some won t try.Each chapter of this story begins with a recipe, providing a focus if not sometimes also a theme for the chapter I happened to also have a Persian cookbook The Saffron Tales Recipes from the Persian Kitchen on my coffee table while reading this, so lots of comparisons were made Not all the recipes were in my cookbook, but many were, and the illustrations really helped to fire my imagination I m not sure that all of Mehran s recipes would work, but they were often reasonably close to the cookbook One I ve picked out to definitely try is the fesenjoon, or chicken with walnuts and pomegranate, which sounds simply divine.Apart from learning a bit about Persian cuisine, I feel like a know a littlenow about the Iranian Revolution, as the sisters slowly reveal their backstory, mainly by internal reflection memory Some of these scenes were quite harrowing, providing a real contrast to the warmth and friendliness of life in the Babylon Cafe

  4. says:

    Sometimes it is good to suspend belief and surrender your imagination to a form of magical realism which can transcend cultural barriers.Three orphaned sisters, who fled Iran seven years earlier, have found their way to a small town in Ireland where they hope to make a home They bring with them their heritage, their demons and their hopes for a better future Marjan, Bahar and Layla open the Babylon Cafe in the heart of Ballinacroagh s Main Mall The smell of traditional Persian cooking wafting Sometimes it is good to suspend belief and surrender your imagination to a form of magical realism which can transcend cultural barriers.Three orphaned sisters, who fled Iran seven years earlier, have found their way to a small town in Ireland where they hope to make a home They bring with them their heritage, their demons and their hopes for a better future Marjan, Bahar and Layla open the Babylon Cafe in the heart of Ballinacroagh s Main Mall The smell of traditional Persian cooking wafting through the Mall works its own magic on many of the townsfolk business is growing as is acceptance But the past is not yet finished with the sisters, and their future is threatened In part this novel is about the clash of cultures and inherent suspicion about what is different It is equally about the power of hope and the unifying role of food and the role of senses in life In many ways, both the characters and the setting are irrelevant to these unifying points The setting could be small town anywhere, the sisters could have any different cultural heritage At the same time as each sister confronts her demons, many of the townspeople find the courage to question their own assumptions and values.The novel contains some delicious recipes which some readers will wish to try, while others of us will simply enjoy the possibility While many of the characters are lightly drawn stereotypes this doesn t really detract from the power of the novel A comparatively light read to be sure, but one with a powerful underlying message for those who want to accept it

  5. says:

    My dear friend Cathy sent me this book, and I imagine that she bought it because of its title Pomegranate Soup, which is the best soup that I have ever eaten She and I had it as a small Persian caf , Soltan Banno, in San Diego, CA just before I moved to Oklahoma.I had met Cathy in an encounter group while in college We both lived in Berkeley, and at one time we both dated Iranians I moved to San Diego just before moving to Oklahoma She and I remain close friends to this very day.In the book My dear friend Cathy sent me this book, and I imagine that she bought it because of its title Pomegranate Soup, which is the best soup that I have ever eaten She and I had it as a small Persian caf , Soltan Banno, in San Diego, CA just before I moved to Oklahoma.I had met Cathy in an encounter group while in college We both lived in Berkeley, and at one time we both dated Iranians I moved to San Diego just before moving to Oklahoma She and I remain close friends to this very day.In the book, three Persian sisters who had escaped Iran, came to Ireland to open up a Persian caf where they served this wonderful soup and other Iranian delights At the end of each chapter there is a recipe, which reminds of the book, Like Water for Chocolate The Iranian, Mehran, that I dated while living in Berkeley, like the woman in this story, had also escaped Iran in the time of the uprising Mehran once made me a Persian dish, Chelo Kabab with Masto Khiar It too was very good But nothing is better than that soup, which recipe I wish I had Both recipes may have been in the book, but I no longer own it so I don t recall

  6. says:

    This was a delicious summer read Part Journey from the Land of No , part The Taste of Chocolate , Marsha Mehran tells a magical tale of 3 sisters who change the village of Ballinacroagh, Ireland when they move to town after fleeing the Iranian revolution In the process of becoming part of the community and influencing the people who live there, they begin to come to terms with their own painful past Each chapter starts with a recipe for a Persian delicacy which is incorporated into the stor This was a delicious summer read Part Journey from the Land of No , part The Taste of Chocolate , Marsha Mehran tells a magical tale of 3 sisters who change the village of Ballinacroagh, Ireland when they move to town after fleeing the Iranian revolution In the process of becoming part of the community and influencing the people who live there, they begin to come to terms with their own painful past Each chapter starts with a recipe for a Persian delicacy which is incorporated into the story At times I really wanted to go out and find a Persian restaurant or to go to a grocery store to find the unusual ingredients required to cook some of these dishes myself

  7. says:

    Journey with the Aminpour sisters as they embark on a new chapter of their lives in Marsha Mehran s novel, Pomegranate Soup Marjan, Bahar and Layla escape amidst the Iran Revolution and open up the Babylon Caf in a small Irish village where they awaken sleeping dreams and ignite new possibilities Anyone who has been an outsider in a close knit community can relate to the sisters who are faced with suspicion and discrimination in their new home Moreover, they continue to be haunted by the pas Journey with the Aminpour sisters as they embark on a new chapter of their lives in Marsha Mehran s novel, Pomegranate Soup Marjan, Bahar and Layla escape amidst the Iran Revolution and open up the Babylon Caf in a small Irish village where they awaken sleeping dreams and ignite new possibilities Anyone who has been an outsider in a close knit community can relate to the sisters who are faced with suspicion and discrimination in their new home Moreover, they continue to be haunted by the past that never leaves A book for travelers and food lovers alike, Pomegranate Soup is resplendent in the history and details of people, tastes and landscapes Mehran builds textural layers of the senses, taking the reader on a voyage of food and places In the process, she portrays food as the vehicle it is in bringing people together and introducing new cultures Indeed, 11 fairly straightforward Persian recipes are included so the reader can do the same This uplifting tale is wonderful tribute to family, community and new beginnings It is a wonderful gift with a tray of rosewater baklava

  8. says:

    I do feel I m being a bit harsh here There was such lot to like about this book I m a sucker for a cozy novel about food, initially it seemed a lightweight derivative of Like water for chocolate which is brilliant of course you can t expect every novel to invent a new genre There is quite a bit of interesting and quite dark material about fleeing from Iran then her sometimes insightful sometimes rather dismissive view of Oirland However ultimately I found this novel really lacked I do feel I m being a bit harsh here There was such lot to like about this book I m a sucker for a cozy novel about food, initially it seemed a lightweight derivative of Like water for chocolate which is brilliant of course you can t expect every novel to invent a new genre There is quite a bit of interesting and quite dark material about fleeing from Iran then her sometimes insightful sometimes rather dismissive view of Oirland However ultimately I found this novel really lacked the cohesion of asuccessful work The character development was poor, the pacing was awful, the story was okay but lacked direction Incidents characters just popped up disappeared There was a strange mix of fragmented past history without much insight neighbour mean, husband was abusive then silly jolly asides about leprechauns, naughty local pranksters ambitions of a disco which didn t really progress the story or add much dimension to the characters Comparing to some pretty solid novels that I have awarded with 3 stars, I felt bound to be a bit cruel here

  9. says:

    Set in the fictitious village of Ballinacroagh of County Mayo in western Ireland, the book opens with three sisters working feverishly as they count down the minutes to the opening of their new caf the Babylon Caf It s here that Marjan, Berhar and Layla are planting their roots after having fled Iran during the Iranian revolution of 1979 via Pakistan to the safe shores of London Having toiled in the U.K for a while, they have found solace in the beautiful country of Ireland, where they fe Set in the fictitious village of Ballinacroagh of County Mayo in western Ireland, the book opens with three sisters working feverishly as they count down the minutes to the opening of their new caf the Babylon Caf It s here that Marjan, Berhar and Layla are planting their roots after having fled Iran during the Iranian revolution of 1979 via Pakistan to the safe shores of London Having toiled in the U.K for a while, they have found solace in the beautiful country of Ireland, where they feel they can put the past behind them and start afresh by recreating the wonderful foods they grew up with dolmeh, red lentil soup, baklava, dugh yogurt drink, abgusht, elephant ears, lavash bread, torshi, chelow, fesenjoon, pomegranate soup, etc Each chapter begins with a recipe and through the wonderful and exotic aromas and flavors of Marjan s cooking we experience the cathartic play of food and its significance in the lives of the three sisters But Iranians settling in the village of Ballinacroagh is not an everyday occurrence people are curious the aromas emanating from the Babylon Caf are different, tantalizing, strange There s excitement let s check out the new people, the caf , the foods Others are not too thrilled who are these strange foreigners bringing their odd foods and ways into a peaceful village, where people have known each other for years We come to experience the everyday goings on in Ballinacroagh the inquisitive neighbor, the parish priest, the mischievous boys, the village bully As the three sisters strive to attract customers and make their caf a success, they painfully experience flashbacks of their time in Iran and what they had to endure before fleeing a revolution that continues to haunt them A beautiful piece of work, wherein the storyline of the present is flavored with the past through the rich and fragrant ingredients of the foods prepared I really enjoyed this book, muchthan I thought I would a highly recommended read

  10. says:

    Fabulous story of Iranian women fleeing the revolution who land in a small Irish town Food figures in it similar to the way it does in Like Water for Chocolate It borders on magical realism Irish Iranian magical realism The moral of the story is that we all must change and move on in our lives the past is always behind us and the future ahead.

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